Player Profile #91 – TE Lance Kendricks

In recent years, the University of Wisconsin has become the breeding ground for tight ends. Lance Hendricks joins the long list of Badgers at that position that enter the league through the NFL Draft.

In the last five years Wisconsin has had four TEs selected – Owen Daniels (2006-Houston), Jason Pociask (2006-N.Y. Jets), Travis Beckum (2009-N.Y. Giants) and Garrett Graham (2010-Houston).

Hendricks will be the fifth Wisconsin TE drafted in six years. It will be the next step in his journey from the streets of Milwaukee to pro football.

Here’s the dossier on Lance Hendricks.

FAMILY AFFAIRS

Lance Hendricks

Born: January 30, 1988 in Milwaukee.

Parents are Leon and Linda Kendricks. Leon is a retired machinist and Linda works for the Milwaukee school district. Lance is the youngest of four boys. Donte is a police detective in Chula Vista, California; Leon is a mechanical engineer for Harley Davidson and Landon works and lives in Milwaukee.

BODY OF WORK

  • Height – 6-foot, 3 inches.
  • Weight – 243 pounds.
  • Arm – 32 inches.
  • Hand – 9 5/8 inches.
  • 40-yard dash – 4.75 seconds (4.57 seconds on Pro Day).
  • 20-yard dash – 2.67 seconds.
  • 10-yard dash – 1.63 seconds.
  • Bench press – 25 reps at 225 pounds.
  • Vertical jump – 34½ inches (38 inches on Pro Day).
  • Broad jump – 10-feet, 2 inches.

HIGH SCHOOL

Hendricks was part of the 2006 graduating class at Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School, a public magnet school on the north side of Milwaukee. Rufus King has been voted the best high school in Wisconsin for six consecutive years.

He earned four letters in football, four in track & field and another one in basketball playing for the Generals. Playing for head coach Scott Hawkins in football, he was named the team’s MVP as both a junior and senior and was team captain as a senior. His career numbers were 102 catches for 1,905 yards. He also finished second in the state triple jump competition as a junior and was third as a sophomore. He was also a four-time AAU triple jump champion.

As a Rufus King senior, Kendricks won first place in the 4th Congressional District Art contest sponsored by the Congressional Arts Caucus. His entry “Color Wheel” was displayed in the Cannon Tunnel, a passageway between the House office buildings and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

FOOTBALL

2005 – In his senior season playing at wide receiver, Kendricks caught 42 passes for 640 yards and 10 TD catches. The Generals finished 6-4, but they were 6-0 in their conference.

2004 – As a junior, he caught 35 passes for 735 yards and 12 touchdowns. He also contributed six interceptions on defense.

2003 – Getting his first taste of action as a sophomore, Kendricks caught 25 passes for 530 yards.

RECRUITING

He committed to Wisconsin on December 27, 2005. His choice came down to the Badgers, UCLA and South Carolina, with Arkansas and LSU also recruiting him.

COLLEGE

Kendricks graduated in December ’10 with a degree in economics.

He was a two-year starter and team captain for the Badgers, earning first-team All-Big 10 honors and second-team All-America status as a senior. He arrived on campus as a wide receiver, but after his freshman year, coaches moved him to tight end.

2010 – He played in 13 games with 11 starts, leading the Badgers in receptions, yards and TDs with 43 for 663 yards and 5 TDs. The season included his career-high performance, coming against Arizona State with 7 catches for 131 yards and 1 TD.

2009 – Kendricks played in 13 games, starting nine and catching 20 passes for 36 yards and three TDs. His breakthrough game came in the Champs Sports Bowl against the University of Miami when he caught seven balls for 128 yards.

2008 – Playing in eight games, he missed the seasons last four games because of a broken fibula suffered on November 1 against Michigan State. He ended up catching six passes for 141 yards.

2007 – In his redshirt-freshman season, he played in one game on special teams.

2006 – He sat out in a redshirt season.    

Year

G

S

Rec.

Yards

Avg.

TD

2010

13

11

43

663

15.4

5

2009

13

9

29

356

12.3

3

2008

8

0

6

141

23.5

0

2007

1

0

0

0

0

0

2006

x

x

x

x

x

x

Total

35

20

78

1,160

14.9

8

Rushing – 9 carries, 92 yards.

EVALUATION FOR PRO FOOTBALL

Strengths – Physically gifted tight end that has very good attributes in all areas of strength, speed, quickness and agility. He’s a big target that fights for the ball and is hard to outmuscle if it’s a jump ball. A very willing blocker, he does a good job of sealing off the line of scrimmage or on the second level down the field. He shows a good understanding of coverages and the ability to adjust quickly and find open spots in zone coverage. Hendricks has the speed to stretch the seam and separate from linebackers or get a step on the safety.

Weaknesses – Kendricks tends to catch too often with his body and not his hands. He’s very inconsistent with his hands; and sometimes drops balls that he should have easily caught. He does not always get away from the line of scrimmage and that seems more of a matter of mechanics than a lack of quickness. He’s a very raw product that can do everything coaches are looking for from a tight end, but he’s far from polished. He needs a great deal of work on fundamentals. Kendricks sometimes feels an incoming defender and gets a case of the alligator arms. He’s on the ground far too much.

Analysis – There’s a lot to work with in Kendricks, and there’s a lot of work to do. The converted wide receiver still looks like a wide out more often than he does an NFL tight end. He will never be a tight end that lines up tight and block on 1st-and-10 run plays. In today’s NFL, he will fit better in the slot or in motion away from the middle of the field where he can reach open field against defenders that are generally going to be slower and less athletic.

WHAT THE SCOUTS SAY

From an AFC scout – “Raw talent and he’ll need a lot of work, but he comes across as a smart kid and a hard worker. If he stays that way, then he has a chance. He needs to get with the right offense where they will use him as a specialist and give him that chance.”

From an NFC scout – “Again, he’s one of those tight ends that if he lands with the Colts may set a record for tight end catches. If he lands with a team that’s less focused on passing, then he may not survive longer than two or three years. He’s a specialist and needs a special place to fit in.”

WHAT HE HAS TO SAY

On transition to college from high school – “In high school we didn’t really have a big playbook, so coming here there was a lot to learn, it was literally starting from step one. That spring, they moved me to tight end, I learned how to block, probably the hardest thing to do.”

On what he learned playing for the Badgers – “At Wisconsin, you understand how to work, what it takes to play and the commitment needed.”

WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY

Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema: “If you took a vote, I bet you our kids would say Lance is one of the top five workers in our program. (He) just does not do anything but work, grind and has become very, very smart at football. He’s playing as good of football as we’ve seen at that position.”

Iowa LB Tyler Nielsen – “He’s more physical than most of the tight ends we’ve played so far. He’s an athletic guy. We’re going to have to be ready for him.”

Iowa S Tyler Sash – “He’s a very good blocker, first and foremost. He’s a big guy. He reminds you of a wide receiver. Obviously he plays tight end, but he has the skill set of a wide receiver. He can block you as well; he’s very physical.”

Wisconsin TE coach Joe Rudolph – “He’s about as tough as they come and he plays big. He’s blossomed into a really good player. And you have to love his unselfishness, his greatest attribute. Ask him to execute 15 lead blocks in a row, he’d be happy to do it. Ask him to run 15 routes in a row, he’d be happy to do that. Whatever you ask him to do, he works his tail off.”

DOES HE FIT WITH THE CHIEFS

Yes and no on fitting in with Pioli/Haley’s team. Hendricks has skills, smarts, work ethic and leadership skills that fit the mold. But he’s not as good an overall player as Tony Moeaki. He might be a better athlete than Moeaki, but he doesn’t block as well as last year’s third-round pick. It’s hard to see Lance Hendricks fitting with the 2011 Chiefs draft class.

Comments are closed.



Get the Flash Player to see the slideshow.


Categories

Other News

Archives


RSS


Pages

Home