Player Profile #85 – WR Jeremy Kerley

There are a lot of very good athletes that come out of Texas in football, basketball, baseball and track.

Then there’s Jeremy Kerley who was a very good athlete in all four of those sports. He was the starting quarterback, starting point guard, pitcher and jumper/sprinter. By the time he was done at Hutto High School, Kerley had won 16 letters in the four sports and received state recognition in all of them. In 2007, the Austin American-Statesman newspaper named him the Central Texas Athlete of the Year.

It was football that Kerly was most successful, and he ended up signing on with Texas Christian and he’s been part of the Horned Frogs great teams over the last few years, including an undefeated season in 2010.

He’s ready to bring his track record of success and athletic ability to the NFL Draft.

Here’s his story.

FAMILY MATTERS

Jeremy Kerley

Born – in Hutto, Texas.

Family – Parents are Charlotte and Donald Kerley. He is the father of two-year old Dae’shone Kerley with Kristal Juarez, a TCU track All-America and the school record holder in the 400 meters at 52.94 seconds. She sat out ’08 outdoor season while pregnant with Dae’shone.

BODY OF WORK

  • Height – 5-feet, 9½ inches.
  • Weight – 189 pounds.
  • Arm – 30 inches.
  • Hand – 9 inches.
  • 40-yard dash – 4.56 seconds (4.56 on Pro Day).
  • 20-yard dash – 2.63 seconds (2.64 seconds).
  • 10-yard dash – 1.58 seconds (1.54 seconds).
  • Bench press – 16 repetitions at 225 pounds.
  • Vertical jump – 34½ inches (37½).
  • Broad jump – 10-feet.

HIGH SCHOOL

Kerley graduated with the class of 2007 from Hutto High School in Hutton, Texas. Hutto is a small town that’s north of Austin and close to Round Rock.

He was the Central Texas Athlete of the Year for his exploits in football, basketball, baseball and track for the Hutto Hippos, earning 16 letters in four years.

On the football field he led Hutto to its first appearance in a state championship game, falling in the 2005 3A-Division II title game to Tatum 38-34. He won back-to-back District MVP honors as a junior and senior, and was second-team all-state both seasons as well. As a sophomore he was named the district’s MVP on defense, and then as a senior he was the district’s MVP on offense.

On the basketball court, he was the starting point guard and earned first-team all-district honors, averaging seven points and five assists per game as a senior.

In baseball, he played at pitcher, shortstop and outfield. He threw a no-hitter, striking out 52 batters in 42 innings, while hitting .444 and leading the team to the playoffs.

On the track, he participated in the high jump, long jump, triple jump and the 400 and 1,600-meter relay teams. He qualified for the state track meet in the long jump and triple jump, winning silver medals in both events.

FOOTBALL

2006 – As a senior playing for coach Lee Penland, he ran for more than 1,000 yards and threw for more than 1,000 yards in leading the Hippos back to the playoffs after their previous appearance in the state title game.

2005 – In his junior season, Kerley ran 174 times for 1,477 yards and 24 TDs. He completed 82 of 155 passes for 1,139 yards and three TDs.

RECRUITING

Kerley committed to TCU in July of 2006. He had a lot of choices, as he was offered scholarships by Oklahoma, Arizona, Baylor, Colorado, Missouri, Nebraska, Texas A&M and Texas Tech.

COLLEGE

Kerley was a Criminal Justice major at TCU.

In his four seasons with the Horned Frogs, he was named Mountain West Conference special teams player of the year twice (2009-10) and was listed as All-MWC first-team return specialists for three seasons. His 563 punt return yards established a new career record at TCU.

Overall, Kerley had 1,299 receiving yards, 1,299 punt return yards, 1,006 kick return yards, 135 passing yards and 306 rushing yards with a total of 20 TDs scored and one thrown. That’s 4,045 all-purpose yards.

2010 – The Frogs went 13-0 and Kerley’s exploits were all over the season, with his best year catching the ball with 56 for 575 yards and 10 TDs. He added a pair of TD rushing plays. He averaged 12.9 yards on punt returns and 27.7 on kickoff returns, one of just two players to rank in the top 20 nationally in both categories. He played in all 13 games, starting 11 times.

2009 – Kerley played in all 13 games as TCU went 12-1 on the season. He started seven of those games and caught 44 passes for 532 yards and 2 TDs. He returned two punts for TDs, a 71-yarder vs. Colorado State and 69 yards vs. SMU. Kerley led the conference in punt return average (14.4 yards) and kickoff return average (26.6); that was good for seventh and 22nd nationally.

2008 – An ankle injury cost him two games and limited his participation in four others. He ended up playing in nine games with three starts. He averaged 13.9 yards per punt return and scored three rushing TDs. Kerley served as holder on FGs and PATs. He also ran for a two-point conversion.

2007 – He was the only true freshman to get playing time with the TCU offense, appearing in 10 games. He caught nine passes and ran six times for 113 total yards.

 Year

 

G

 

S

 

Rec.

 

Yds

 

TD

 

 

Att.

 

Yds

 

TD

 

Punt

Ret

 

Yds

 

TD

2010

13

11

56

575

10

 

18

97

2

 

30

388

0

2009

13

7

44

532

2

 

14

50

3

 

39

563

2

2008

9

3

11

95

0

 

25

143

3

 

25

348

0

2007

10

0

9

97

0

 

6

16

0

 

0

0

0

Total

45

21

120

1,299

12

 

63

306

8

 

94

1,299

2

Returned 37 kickoffs for 1,006 yards, a 27.2 average. Completed 5 of 7 passes for 135 yards with 1 TD and 1 INT. Scored 2-point conversion in 2008.

EVALUATION FOR PRO FOOTBALL
STRENGTHS – There’s no wasted motion when Kerley runs. He’s quick off the line and gets up to top speed in a snap of the fingers and continues to accelerate as the play goes on. He’s especially effective in underneath routes and is not afraid of going across the middle. He runs sharp, precise routes and is consistently able to get separation from cornerbacks Kerley has powerful hands and is able to snatch the ball out of the air, seldom allowing it to get into his body. He’s able to get low to catch passes at his ankles and he’s agile enough to twist his body to catch passes thrown behind him. He’s got good awareness o the sidelines. Very good at returning punts Kerley uses his vision and instincts in the open field to break away.

WEAKNESSES – Less than ideal size numbers, he’s also not gifted with top-end speed. He has shown trouble in the past getting off the line of scrimmage against physical press coverage. Kerley is prone to look down the field before securing the ball, and thus has his problems with drops. Does not have the speed to get behind the defense or run away from defenders. At TCU he caught most of his passes in short throws, five yards off the line of scrimmage.

ANALYSIS – Kerley had a good Senior Bowl performance and that opened the eyes of some scouts who viewed him as too small and slow. He’s talented enough to play outside, but is probably best suited to play in the slot where he can use his quickness to get separation. With his background as a high school quarterback, he’s has some skills to go out and play in the Wildcat formation and put real doubt in the mind of the defense.

WHAT SCOUTS HAVE TO SAY

From an AFC scout – “I really like this kid and he brings a lot to a team. By no means is he a finished product and that’s going to take some time to get him up to speed on the mental side of being a receiver in the NFL. But he’s a big play waiting to happen.”

From an NFC scout – “His lack of size, bulk and strength makes me think his time in the league will be short. I’m not sure he can handle the pounding. That’s what’s driving him down the board. He’s more quick than fast.”

WHAT HE HAS TO SAY

“I love the thrill. I love everything special teams brings, not only just punt return or kick returner, but running down as a gunner, running down as a kickoff man. That’s something that I always prided myself on and something I always will try to take part in.”

“Getting hit, making guys miss, scoring a touchdown, that’s the thrill of football.”

WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY

TCU co-offensive coordinator Jarrett Anderson – “While he’s a very talented young man, he also has football intelligence, which allows you to do different things with him. You can kind of just throw him in there. He can figure it out on the fly. Obviously he is incredible at change of direction. He’s not afraid to go over the middle and make the tough catch. He’s got great ball skills, all those sorts of things, which adds a great element that we can sit in the staff room and say, what do we want to do today with Jeremy?”

Wisconsin safety Aaron Henry – “This guy can change the game in an instant. It’s our job to recognize him every play of every down. I’m not saying any of those other guys can’t make plays, but he can change the game, whether it’s on punt return, kickoff return or even on offense catching a 2-yard throw and taking it for 70 or 80.”

DOES HE FIT WITH THE CHIEFS?

Kerley is a guy that could help just about any team he lands with, including and especially the Chiefs. They can use his offensive ability with the receivers on hand. His return ability could allow him to make an immediate contribution and not force so much out of Dexter McCluster and Javier Arenas. His abilities in the wildcat would be something that would get plenty of use from Todd Haley and the offensive staff. He’s been a durable guy and has shown no problems off the field. Plus, if you draft this guy, you get a winner. In his four seasons at TCU, the Frogs went 43-8, including 25-1 over the last two years.

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