Player Profile #77 – OLB Brooks Reed

With his flowing blond hair streaking out the back of his helmet and his body hurtling towards the quarterbacks, Brooks Reed looks like a carbon copy of Packers LB Clay Matthews, who had great success dropping passers last year.

Reed hopes to do the same thing in 2011 advancing from the University of Arizona to the playing fields of the NFL. He’s one of those players who gained position on draft boards thanks to his performance at the NFL Combine, where he showed great quickness and speed.

Here’s his story.

FAMILY AFFAIR

Robert Brooks Reed.

Born – February 28, 1987 in Tucson, Arizona.

Family – Parents are Bob and Kathleen (Webster) Reed. Dad was an all-Tucson wrestler at Catalina High School in the 1960s. He went on to wrestle at the University of Arizona. The Reeds have two other children, twins Lucas and Katie. Lucas will be a junior TE at the University of New Mexico this fall.

BODY OF WORK

  • Height – 6-feet, 2½ inches.
  • Weight – 263 pounds.
  • Arms – 32¼ inches.
  • Hand – 10 inches.
  • 40-yard dash – 4.65 seconds.
  • 20-yard dash – 2.63 seconds.
  • 10-yard dash – 1.54 seconds.
  • Bench press – 30 repetitions at 225 pounds.
  • Vertical jump – 30½ inches.
  • Broad jump – 9-feet, 5 inches.

HIGH SCHOOL

Reed was part of the graduating class of 2006 at Sabino High School, part of the Tucson Unified School District.

As a DE/TE/RB, he was a big contributor to the Sabercats of head coach Jay Campos, earning first-team All-Arizona honors as a senior and honorable mention in his junior season.

He also participated in wrestling and track at Sabino H.S.

FOOTBALL

2005 – The Sabercats were 10-4 on the season and went to the state title game, where they lost to Glendale Cactus. Reed ran 57 times for 377 yards and five TD runs. He added 12 catches for 143 yards and one TD. Defensively, he added 28 total tackles and 3 sacks. He also was Sabino’s punter, averaging 36.6 yards a kick.

2004 – Reed had a big season for the 8-3 Cats, as he ran for 482 yards and three TDs; caught 13 passes for 155 yards and two scores. He added 25 total tackles and 3 sacks, with a 33.8-yard punting average. On the season, Reed scored touchdowns on running plays and catches, with a two-point conversion, 3 PAT kicks, a FG and a safety.

RECRUITING

Reed was offered scholarships by Arizona State, California, Colorado, Colorado State and Purdue. He committed to Arizona and head coach Mike Stoops early in 2006.

COLLEGE

Reed majored in geography at the University of Arizona.

He earned first-team All-Pac 10 Conference honors in 2010, plus honorable mention All-Pac 10 in 2008. In 43 games, he started 34 times, with 114 career tackles and 17 sacks.

During his five years with the Wildcats program, Reed added 50 pounds – he was 215 pounds as a freshman – while improving his speed, from 4.8 seconds to 4.6 in the 40-yard dash. His bench press improved from 315 to 425 pounds; his power clean lift from 315 pounds to 405; his squat lift from 405 pounds to 555.

2010 – Reed started all 13 games and contributed 47 tackles, 10 tackles for loss, 6.5 sacks, 2 PBU and a forced fumble. His best performance was against UCLA when he contributed 6 tackles, 2 TFL, 1 sack and the FF.

2009 – He played 10 games, starting eight times, as he missed three games due to a high ankle sprain. Reed had 23 total tackles, 5 TFL, 2 sacks and a forced fumble.

2008 – Starting all 13 games, Reed finished the season with 37 total tackles, 9.5 TFL, 8 sacks, 3 forced fumble and 2 passes defensed. His best game was against California, when he had 5 tackles, 2 TFL, 2 sacks and forced a fumble.

2007 – Reed played in 7 games and finished with 7 total tackles and half a sack. Opened the season as an H-Back, but then made switch early in the season to defensive end.

2006 – Redshirt season. Arrived on campus and in the program at 215 pounds

 

Year

 

G

 

S

Tot

Tkl.

 

TFL

 

Sks.

 

QH

 

FF

 

RF

2010

13

13

47

10

6.5

1

1

 

2009

10

8

23

5

2

0

1

 

2008

13

13

37

9.5

8

0

3

 

2007

7

0

7

.5

.5

1

0

 

Totals

43

34

114

25

17

2

5

 

EVALUATION FOR PRO FOOTBALL

Strengths – Very fluid in his movements and is quick out of the blocks on the snap or when changing direction. He shows that quickness on the outside rushing the passer off the edge and is relentless in his pursuit. Reed stays low when he’s engaged with a blocker. He’s got a good bull rush and very good speed rush. As a consistent tackler, he can deliver the big hit. He’s a quiet leader of the team, who attempts to lead by example.

Weaknesses – He plays stiff in his hips and sometimes has problem changing directions. He doesn’t get the blockers off him as consistently with his hands as he should. Reed needs work on hand fighting and pushing through the trash between him and the football.

Analysis – Reed projects to OLB in a 3-4 defense. At the NFL Combine he worked out with the defensive ends and showed with his quickness and burst that he’s better suited as a 3-4 OLB. He’s a good enough athlete and has the agility to handle all aspects of playing the outside backer spot.

WHAT THE SCOUTS SAY

An AFC scout said – “Everybody sees him as the next Clay Matthews, but he’s not as athletic as Matthews so I don’t think he’s going to transition as quickly. He’s got a great motor and he never stops. He’s a lot like (Tamba) Hali in that way.”

WHAT HE HAS TO SAY

“You can be a big strong guy in the weight room, but if you can’t bring it to the field and show your strength on the line going up against somebody, it’s almost worthless.”

“On paper I have the prototypical size, speed and strength to be a 3-4 linebacker, and would be an undersized defensive end in a 4-3 scheme, and I believe I have the athleticism to make the switch from a hand down guy to a stand up guy. I think that’s the best position on the field, I mean, you get to rush the quarterback most of the time along with some dropping responsibility. I think it will be a fun adjustment for me.”

“I think you can lead by example. To me, that’s why I play so hard in practice. I know that the only way I can be good in a game is to be good in practice. You’ve got to love to play. You just can’t play for the scholarship money.”

WHAT THEY SAY ABOUT HIM

University of Arizona DE coach Jeff Hammerschmidt – “He’s got one speed, and that’s flat-out, in your face. He’s relentless, focused and explosive.”

DOES HE FIT WITH THE CHIEFS?

His college background is very much like that of Mike Vrabel when he came out of Ohio State. Vrabel was a defensive end, who made the transition to OLB. While he did not set the league on fire, he ended up being a good to very good outside backer for over a decade. The intangibles all seem good with Reed, and there doesn’t appear to be anything in his time at Arizona that would indicate he’s a risk. Yes, he would fit with the Chiefs.

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS OF BROOKS REED

Arizona OLB/DE Brooks Reed

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