Player Profile #60 – CB Curtis Marsh

The pool of prospects for the 2011 NFL Draft includes a handful of legacy players – young men attempting to match the accomplishments of their fathers who came into the NFL.

At Ohio State is the late Craig “Ironhead” Heyward’s son Cameron, a highly rated DE. California DE Cameron Jordan can turn to his father former Vikings TE Steve Jordan for advice. Connecticut LB Greg Lloyd can get an analysis of his play from the man he was named after, the former Steelers LB.

And Curtis Marsh can always call his Dad, Curtis Marsh Sr. The Utah State CB traveled a tough road to prepare for the NFL Draft; it hasn’t been that different than his father’s football journey some 20 years ago.

Here’s the rest of Curtis Marsh’s story. 

FAMILY MATTERS

Curtis Joseph Marsh, Jr.

Born – March 1, 1988 in Los Angeles, California.

Family – Parents are Curtis J. Marsh Sr. and Trayci Gibson. Dad was a wide receiver at the University of Utah and the NFL with Jacksonville and Pittsburgh (1995-97). He played in 15 games, catching 9 passes for 141 yards and averaged 21.5 yards on 15 kickoff returns. After attending three high schools and not playing football, Curtis Sr. went to Moorpark (Junior) College in Los Angeles and began playing football. At the time he said his motivation for school/football was his one-year old son, Curtis Jr.

BODY OF WORK

  • Height – 6-feet, ½ inch.
  • Weight – 197 pounds.
  • Arm – 32 inches.
  • Hand – 9 inches.
  • 40-yard dash – 4.42 seconds.
  • 20-yard dash – 2.52 seconds.
  • 10-yard dash – 1.59 seconds.
  • Bench press – 12 repetitions at 225 pounds.
  • Vertical j ump – 37½ inches.
  • Broad jump – 10-feet, 3 inches.

HIGH SCHOOL

Marsh graduated with the class of 2006 from Royal High School, part of the Simi Valley Unified School District in Simi Valley, California. He played two seasons with the Highlanders under head coach Gene Uebelhardt.

He received first team all-league and all-county honors as a senior.

Track was part of his high school life and during his junior year he finished third in the state in the long jump at 23-feet, 10 inches. He was second in the county in the 100 meters at 10.6 seconds. His best time in the 200 meters was 22.93 seconds.

FOOTBALL

2005 – Marsh ran for 1,608 yards on 233 carries and 12 TDs. He caught two passes for 30 yards. On defense he contributed 32 total tackles and 7 interceptions. Against Channel Islands H.S. he ran for 215 yards and 2 TDs, and added 199 yards and a TD against Agoura H.S. The Highlanders finished 6-4 on the season.

2004 – He ran for 450 yards and contributed defensively as well, as the Highlanders won the Marmonte League title and finished the year with an 8-4 record.

PREP SCHOOL

Marsh was going to accept an offer to attend the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland but he had trouble with some academic issues and instead went to the Naval Academy Preparatory School in Newport, Rhode Island. This is an avenue of many young men who sign to play football for the Midshipmen. It’s really a pseudo redshirt season, but they are able to play in football games at Navy Prep.

Back in February, a Naval Academy graduate asked Congress to investigate – and possibly abolish – Navy Prep. According to Alfred W. Tate, Naval Academy Class of 1964, the Naval Academy Preparatory School (NAPS) has become a way to “red shirt” recruited athletes and give unqualified minority students a back door into the Naval Academy. In an e-mail to U.S. Sen. James Webb, Tate called NAPS, and similar programs run by the U.S. Military Academy and the Air Force Academy, a misuse of federal funds.

RECRUITING

He signed with Utah State in December 2006 and enrolled in January 2007.

COLLEGE

Marsh majored in Business at Utah State University.

He spent his first two seasons at Utah State on offense as a running back. In spring football 2009, he was moved to cornerback.

In 2010, he earned second team All-WAC honors.

2010 – He started all 12 games at CB, finishing with 45 tackles and 2 INTs.

2009 – Marsh played in all 12 games on defense with 4 starts, totaling 32 tackles. He blocked punt vs. San Jose State.

2008 – He played in 12 games, making 3 starts. Marsh had 42 carries for 185 yards and 12 catches for 114 yards. He ran for 67 yards on 4 carries against Idaho. On the season, Marsh finished with 406 all-purpose yards.

2007 – He played 10 games, started 3 and ran for 302 yards rushing and 96 receiving yards.

Defense

 Year

 

G

 

S

Tot.

Tkl.

 

TFL

 

INT

 

PBU

 

BLK

2010

12

12

45

1

2

13

0

2009

12

4

32

0

1

5

1

Totals

24

16

77

1

3

18

1

Rushing & Receiving

Year

G

S

Att.

Yds.

TD

Rec.

Yds

TD

2008

12

3

42

185

2

12

114

1

2007

10

3

82

302

2

16

96

0

Totals

22

6

124

487

4

28

210

1

Returned 7 kickoffs an average of 15.3 yards with a long return of 20 yards.

EVALUATION FOR PRO FOOTBALL

Strengths – Natural athlete, with great speed, quickness and agility, he has good body control and balance. Marsh has fluid hips that allow him to turn and run downfield. From his time on offense he has soft hands and very good sills when going after the ball. He’ll go after the tackle and will support the run, not shying away from contact.

Weaknesses – Every day has been a learning experience for the former RB. He’s very raw as a DB and needs a lot of work on technique and footwork. Instincts are not honed for the position. Penalty prone due to his lack of experience and poor fundamentals, he has to learn to walk that magic line between aggression and getting flagged.

Analysis – Check his physical numbers and Marsh is the type of athlete every league team is looking for on their roster. Too bad he’s got so far to come when it comes to playing the secondary in the NFL. A team that selects him will need to be very patient, but it could pay off big.

WHAT THE SCOUTS SAY

A scout for an NFC team said – “Good athlete; he really looks like a player. But whether he can play, I don’t know. We’ve got him at the bottom of our board.”

WHAT OTHERS SAY

Utah State head coach Gary Anderson – “I believe he is a next level defender. I think he should get that opportunity. Time will tell, but he did a tremendous job of adjusting to the position switch.”

DOES HE FIT WITH THE CHIEFS?

Marsh may have too far to go when it comes to playing cornerback at an NFL level for the Chiefs. Pioli/Haley do not mind developmental projects and that’s what Marsh would be given just two years of defensive back experience. Unfortunately for Marsh that time in coverage came against less than top-level opponents. It’s one thing to be playing against Georgia, Florida, LSU and Alabama; it’s another to face San Jose State, New Mexico State and Louisiana Tech.

Comments are closed.



Get the Flash Player to see the slideshow.


Categories

Other News

Archives


RSS


Pages

Home