Just Short Of A Billion … Morning Cup O’Chiefs

Apparently, the world of the NFL is even closer to labor peace on Friday than it was 24 hours before.

Negotiating in New York, the owners and players have reportedly worked out the major points of a rookie wage scale that will supposedly go into effect immediately, as in the 2011 season. Both sides apparently gave a little, and it continues to look like a long weekend of legalese will culminate in a Tuesday meeting in Minneapolis that will bring a handshake and an agreement. The rookie wage scale was the last major item on the checklist.

So soon, the players will get back to earning their millions and the owners will get back to making sure their football investment retains its value. If it’s an NFL team, there’s a very good chance that value is $1 billion.

Forbes magazine has identified the 50 most valuable sports teams in the world – yes, the world – in its current edition. Of those 50 teams, all 32 NFL teams are listed, led by the Dallas Cowboys that are worth $1.816 billion. That ranks them as the No. 2 most valuable sports franchise in the world, behind only English soccer team Manchester United. That club is reportedly worth $1.866 billion.

The Hunt Family investment in the Chiefs ranks No. 27 at $965 million. Among the 32 NFL teams, the Chiefs are No. 20. That’s an impressive number that Forbes has thrown out there. But remember this – that would be more than $850 million behind Jerry Jones and the Cowboys.

In fact, the growing gap between the 32 NFL teams is visible in these ratings. The final NFL team that made the list was the Jacksonville Jaguars at $725 million. That means Jones has almost $1.1 billion in value more to work with than Wayne Weaver and his ownership group in Jacksonville. It even leaves them $240 million in value behind the Chiefs.

The folks at Forbes do a pretty good job on these things but the real number on what the Chiefs are worth is something that only the Hunt Family and their bean counters may know. It may also be a fluid number because there’s so much that changes in the economic world with things like the new labor agreement we hope to see finalized next week.

But, I think the Chiefs value is higher. Whether it passes $1 billion I’m not so sure, but the magazine has the Chiefs behind Carolina, Tampa Bay, Cleveland, Miami, Pittsburgh, Tennessee and Seattle. I believe the Hunts’ financial picture is better than the Panthers, Buccaneers, Browns and Titans. They should be ranked No. 15 or 16 in the league, despite their small market size. They’ve always had a good lease situation at Arrowhead Stadium. The Hunts contributed to the renovations that open a lot of new revenue streams for the team, but the majority of the bill was picked up by the taxpayers of Jackson County.

If the team had kept winning on the field, it would be worth more than $1 billion right now.

There’s no doubt that over 51 years, it’s a great return of the $25,000 franchise fee that Lamar Hunt plunked down to be the American Football League’s first team back in 1960. Using formulas that translate the purchasing power from one decade to the next, that $25,000 some 51 years ago would equal $184,000 today. That’s hilarious, given the fact that the NFL rookie minimum salary figures to be higher than that number.

Here is the Forbes list:

# Team

Sport

Value
1. Manchester United F.C.

European soccer

$1,866,000,000
2. Dallas Cowboys

NFL

$1,816,000,000
3. New York Yankees

MLB

$1,700,000,000
4. Washington Redskins

NFL

$1,550,000,000
5. Real Madrid C.F.

European soccer

$1,450,000,000
6. New England Patriots

NFL

$1,376,000,000
7. Arsenal F.C.

European soccer

$1,190,000,000
8. New York Giants

NFL

$1,180,000,000
9. Houston Texans

NFL

$1,170,000,000
10. New York Jets

NFL

$1,140,000,000
11. Philadelphia Eagles

NFL

$1,120,000,000
12. Baltimore Ravens

NFL

$1,070,000,000
13. Ferrari

Auto Racing

$1,070,000,000
14. Chicago Bears

NFL

$1,070,000,000
15. Denver Broncos

NFL

$1,050,000,000
16. Indianapolis Colts

NFL

$1,040,000,000
17. Carolina Panthers

NFL

$1,040,000,000
18. Tampa Bay Buccaneers

NFL

$1,030,000,000
19. F.C. Bayern Munich

European soccer

$1,030,000,000
20. Green Bay Packers

NFL

$1,020,000,000
21. Cleveland Browns

NFL

$1,020,000,000
22. Miami Dolphins

NFL

$1,010,000,000
23. Pittsburgh Steelers

NFL

$996,000,000
24. Tennessee Titans

NFL

$994,000,000
25. Seattle Seahawks

NFL

$989,000,000
26. F.C. Barcelona

European soccer

$975,000,000
27. Kansas City Chiefs

NFL

$965,000,000
28. New Orleans Saints

NFL

$955,000,000
29. San Francisco 49ers

NFL

$925,000,000
30. Arizona Cardinals

NFL

$919,000,000
31. Boston Red Sox

MLB

$912,000,000
32. San Diego Chargers

NFL

$907,000,000
33. Cincinnati Bengals

NFL

$905,000,000
34. A.C. Milan

European soccer

$838,000,000
35. Atlanta Falcons

NFL

$831,000,000
36. Detroit Lions

NFL

$817,000,000
37. McLaren Group

Auto racing

$815,000,000
38. Los Angeles Dodgers

MLB

$800,000,000
39. Buffalo Bills

NFL

$799,000,000
40. St. Louis Rams

NFL

$779,000,000
41. Minnesota Vikings

NFL

$774,000,000
42. Chicago Cubs

MLB

$772,000,000
43. Oakland Raiders

NFL

$758,000,000
44. New York Mets

MLB

$747,000,000
45. Jacksonville Jaguars

NFL

$725,000,000
46. Chelsea F.C.

European soccer

$658,000,000
47. New York Knicks

NBA

$655,000,000
48. Los Angeles Lakers

NBA

$643,000,000
49. Juventus F.C.

European soccer

$628,000,000
50. Philadelphia Phillies

MLB

$609,000,000

4 Responses to “Just Short Of A Billion … Morning Cup O’Chiefs”

  • July 15, 2011  - Johnfromfairfax says:

    Maybe that explains why Jerry Jones has been quoted saying that ownership revenue sharing is on its way out. How long do you think he and Dan Snyder will continue sharing the pie in the way Lamar Hunt and the other AFL owners did in their day before they demand a bigger slice based on their ability to generate more revenue for themselves. It doesn’t appear we’re in danger of this issue derailing the return of football this time but it also doesn’t bode well for the future when you look at the disparity between the teams throughout the league and particularly if the gap in values continues to widen.


  • July 15, 2011  - el cid says:

    Makes sense but would wipe out “parity” and would give owners (un-named) who would be satisfied with doing the minimum to keep a team and give its area fans no chance of seeing championship type football. Just a reminder, we had one of the lowest payrolls for 3 years, I guess we did not need a “good” WR, no we tried every stumble bum off the streets and look at all the money we saved. What would keep the Chiefs from becoming the Royals, all that meally mouth “small market”, cannot compete against the big boys. Yeah, could happen but would be death sentence to us.


  • July 15, 2011  - JohnFromFairfax says:

    I agree completely with El Cid. That’s why I’ve always said that the revenue sharing between teams is the bottom line for me. I watched what happened to the Pittsburgh Pirates when baseball changed through free agency in the 90′s and they became a farm club for the major market teams. I stopped following them and baseball after being a life long fan and would do the same with football if it changed to that degree. Hopefully the football owners collectively will keep the foresight of Lamar Hunt and others in mind and not change the basic structure of the game to the degree that would allow that to happen.


  • July 15, 2011  - Justin says:

    Just out of curiosity, where are the Yankees?




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