Draft Profile – WR A.J. Jenkins


A.J. JENKINS/WIDE RECEIVER

PERSONAL

Alfred Alonzo Jenkins

Born – September 30, 1989 in Jacksonville, Florida

Family – Parents are Sandra Brice and Alfred Jenkins Jr.

PHYSICAL

  • Height – 6 feet, ¼ inches.
  • Weight – 190 pounds.
  • Arm – 32¾ inches.
  • Hand – 9½ inches.
  • Wing span – 77½ inches.

NFL Scouting Combine

  • 40-yard dash – 4.39 seconds.
  • Bench press – 12 reps at 225 pounds.
  • Vertical jump – 38½ inches.
  • Broad jump – 10-feet, 4 inches.

Hometown

Jenkins grew up in Jacksonville, Florida.

High School

He was a member of the graduating class of 2008 at Terry Parker High School, part of the Duval County Public School District. The school has approximately 2,000 students. He played for Braves head coach Greg Stanton.

2007 – In his senior season, he caught 41 passes for 515 yards and scored four touchdowns. He also ran for 251 yards on 40 carries. TPHS finished the season 5-5.

2006 – Jenkins caught 32 passes for 500 yards in his junior year, as the Braves went 6-4..

Recruiting

The Scout.com service rated him a 4-star recruit and the No. 36 wide receiver in the country. Rivals.com ranked him as a 4-star recruit and the No. 53 ranked wide receiver across the country.

Schools that showed an interest in Jenkins were Illinois, Florida, Georgia Tech, LSU, Maryland, Miami and South Carolina. He made a verbal commitment to Georgia Tech before his senior high school season, but pulled that back when rumors began about the job status of Chan Gailey. Eventually, he decided on going to Illinois.

College

Jenkins played all four seasons of his eligibility for the Fighting Illini and head coach Ron Zook. He ended

2011 – Named first-team All-Big 10 Conference offense. His performance against Northwestern when he caught 12 passes for 268 yards and 3 TDs broke the Illinois single game receiving record and it was the fourth best receiving day in Big 10 history. By the end of the season, Jenkins accounted for 53 percent of the Illini offensive passing game. He had touchdown catches of 67 and 77 yards.

2010 – Jenkins played in all 13 games, starting nine and led the team with 56 catches for 746 yards. He was named the team’s most outstanding receiver and was named the Illini’s most improved offensive player.

2009 – He played in eight games, starting three times. Jenkins ended up missing the last four games of the season because of an MCL tear in one of his knees.

2008 – He was on the field for 12 games, starting once as a true freshman. Hit on a 96-yard kickoff return against Indiana and caught 3 passes for 117 yards and 2 TDs vs. Minnesota.

Year 

G/S 

Rec 

Yds

Avg 

TD 

Att 

Yds

TD 

KR 

Yds 

TD 

Rec. 

2011 

13/13

90

1,276

14.2

8

5

26

0 

5 

79 

0 

7-6*

2010 

13/9

56 

746 

13.3

7 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

7-6* 

2009 

8/3

10 

123 

12.3

1 

1 

-1 

0 

11 

204 

0 

3-9

2008 

12/1

11 

287 

26.1

3 

0 

0 

0 

22 

490 

1 

5-7

Total 

45/25

167

2,432

14.6

18 

6

25

0 

38 

773 

1 

22-28

-Also had three tackles; *-2011 (Fight Hunger Bowl); 2010 (Texas Bowl).

Evaluation

Strengths – Fluid runner, with excellent speed and he can create separation from defenders, especially on underneath routes where his slippery moves give him openings. He really stretches the defense. Very good hands and almost always snatches the ball outside his body. Jenkins has played both outside and inside and that helps any offense. He’s not afraid to go after the ball, willing to throw himself in front of the throw and the defenders if he must.

Deficient – Needs to add weight and strength if he’s going to be a major contributor in the NFL. He’s weak at getting of the press coverage at the line of scrimmage. Jenkins is also not much of a factor as a blocker and that’s a problem. He drops too many catchable passes, almost always because of a lack of concentration. He is a bit cocky and known for sometimes saying or doing the wrong thing at the wrong time.

Analysis – There’s no question he can help just about any team with his athletic ability and speed at the wide receiver position. He’s a big play waiting to happen. But he’s very inconsistent and there have been questions about his work ethic as well. He has diva potential, but also has the potential to be a contributor to any offense with his elusiveness and power. Attitude is in question as well, as he had several run-ins with Zook and his coaching staff.

Video

Jenkins’ big day against Northwestern in 2011 — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGLtevlRYjs

Jenkins interview after Northwestern performance — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_zJ04CvXC4

What the scouts say

From an AFC scout – “If he played and produced to the level he thinks he’s at, then this kid would be a lock top five, 10 pick. He’s got the ego, but he doesn’t have the work ethic or the determination to be the best. He’s like a lot of kids playing that position in the college ranks – they think they have it figured out. Jenkins needs a lot of work before he’ll make his mark.”

From an NFC scout – “Is he fast? Yes. Does he have good body control? Yes. Does he have good soft hands? Yes. Is he dedicated to his craft and willing to supplant his ego for that of the team? Now that’s one we don’t have answers for. Too many Diva examples, too many times his lack of concentration has hurt his team. This kid needs to grow up and he’ll be a fine player.”

What A.J. Jenkins said

“I’m kind of known for not thinking too smart.”

“I’m the best receiver in the Big Ten just because I work harder than the receivers out there. I have the best coach, the best quarterback, the best linemen and the best sidekick. Having the best things around me makes me the best receiver in the Big Ten.”

What others said about A.J. Jenkins

“Each time he has a chance to make plays, we expect him to do it. That’s what he did a great job of. It was fun throwing the ball to him and seeing him make big plays.” Illinois QB Nathan Scheelhaase.

“He has great speed and quickness and some guys don’t have both. He can really reach out and catch the ball away from his body. He has always had those traits, but it’s about attitude and showing up and working hard every day in practice.” Former Illinois offensive coordinator Paul Petrino.

“What traits does he have? He can separate. He can get out of his breaks and catch a ball away from his body. He’s fast. He’s quick. He’s got it all. He just needs to keep that attitude, and he has. He just needs to keep it getting better and better, and he can make some money some day.” More from Petrino.

Does A.J. Jenkins fit with the Chiefs?

Again, any player with the athletic ability and speed that Jenkins has can help any team in the league. He’s probably not a No. 1 receiver, more likely a No. 2. That’s something the Chiefs have plenty of right now. I doubt he’s under serious consideration by Scott Pioli.

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