Player Profile #72 – DB Quinton Carter

Quinton Carter has a factor on and off the field during his five years in Norman, Oklahoma.

The Las Vegas native was a two-year starter at free safety for the Sooners, earning first-team All-America honors as a senior. In the Oklahoma community, he was also a powerful force. That’s one reason he was named to the 2010 Allstate American Football Coaches Association Good Works Team and why he was named the winner of the seventh annual Wooden Citizen Cup, presented annually those athletes whose character represents the highest and best in sport, and who make the greatest difference in the lives of others. Part of that comes from his non-profit organization that he founded, SOUL (Serving Others Through Unity and Leadership.) He’s organized football camps and special days out for dad around Father’s day. Plus he’s mentoring a group of five friends and he visits weekly at a KinderCare facility.

Here’s the story of Quinton Carter.

FAMILY MATTERS

QUINTON CARTER

Born – July 20, 1988 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Family – Parent are Clemon and Sondra Carter. Dad was an all-state cornerback at Las Vegas High and went on to play at Dixie Junior College and at an NAIA school, Eastern New Mexico. Quinton is the middle child between an older brother and a younger sister.

BODY OF WORK

  • Height 6-feet, ½ inch.
  • Weight – 208 pounds.
  • Arm – 31½ inches.
  • Hand – 9¼ inches.
  • 40-yard dash – 4.57 seconds.
  • 20-yard dash – 2.6 seconds.
  • 10-yard dash – 1.62 seconds.
  • Bench press – 23 repetitions at 225 pounds.
  • Vertical jump – 34½ inches.
  • Broad jump – 10-feet, 1-inch.

HIGH SCHOOL

Carter graduated with the class of 2006 from Cheyenne High, in North Las Vegas, Nevada. He played three years for coach Dave Sanders and the Desert Shields. Carter was the starting quarterback and led C.H.S. to records of 9-2 and 7-4.

He earned all-league honors as a junior and was named to the Las Vegas Sun’s All-Decade high school football team as a defensive back.

Basketball was also on his agenda at Cheyenne High.

Football

2005 – The Shields went 7-4 on the season and Carter ran for 412 yards on 103 carries and 4 TDs. He also threw for 678 yards and 8 TD passes. On defense he had 4 INTs.

2004 – Cheyenne put up a 9-2 record and Carter ran for 104 yards and 5 TDs. He threw for 503 yards on 6 TDs.

Recruiting

Carter made four visits as he tried to find the right school, visiting Oklahoma, Fresno State, Oregon State and Nevada-Las Vegas. Also Colorado State, UCLA and Washington State showed some interest. He was not highly recruited and thus committed to the Sooners in late December 2005.

COLLEGE

Carter earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology with a minor in non-profit organization studies from the University of Oklahoma in December 2010. He enrolled in January ’06 after graduating high school a semester early.

He earned All-Big 12 second-team defensive honors in 2009-10 and was part of the first-team Associated Press All-America team in 2010.

Over his career with the Sooners he played in 44 games with 221 career tackles and 8 interceptions.

2010 – Carter earned national attention in his senior season, leading the Sooners with 4 interceptions and putting up 96 tackles. He had a career-high performance with 17 tackles against Texas Tech.

2009 – He became the starting free safety and was second on the team with 80 tackles. He had four interceptions and recovered a fumble. In the Sun Bowl against Stanford, he had 8 tackles and an interception with his 88 tackles, 2.5 for loss, 5 PBU and 4 interceptions.

2008 – There were two starts at safety for Carter, including opening against Kansas, a game where he had 10 tackles. He finished with 36 tackles and 2 PBZU and added 14 special teams tackles.

2007 – He sat out the year on a redshirt season due to a severely pulled hamstring.

2006 – Carter played in five games, all on special teams and got credit for one tackle.

 Season

 

G

 

S

Tot.

Tkl.

 

TFL

 

INT

 

PBU

 

FF

 

RF

2010

14

14

96

2.5

4

6

0

1

2009

13

13

88

2.5

4

5

0

1

2008

12

2

36

.5

0

2

0

0

2007

0

0

X

X

X

X

X

X

2006

5

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

44

29

221

5.5

8

13

0

2

2007 – redshirt season.

EVALUATION FOR PRO FOOTBALL

Strengths – Good athletic skills with nice speed, a better burst, quickness and good agility. He’s physically tough and isn’t afraid of contact. Good against the run and the pass. He has good range in the deep secondary and does react well to the flow of the game. Football smart with very good instincts for the game; he understands what offenses are trying to do against him. Carter is best in zone coverage, where he can react to what’s happening in front of him. He’s a big hitter at the back of the defense and has been known to show up a split-second late with a big tackle that draws a flag. He set the tone for the Sooners defense. Pretty good at finding the ball in the air, gets head around and goes after it, has reasonably good ball skills and has been known to make acrobatic catches

Weaknesses – He is not always fluid in coverage and does not match up well against all receivers. Loves the big hit, but often goes for it without considering the ramifications of a miss, and has been beaten badly by the missed tackle. Vulnerable to double moves and can get himself in bad positions when he reacts to play action or draw plays. Inconsistency has been a problem – he can look like a Pro Bowler one game, very ordinary the next. Too many blown coverages.

Analysis – His skills leave him as a tweener, between cornerback and safety. More than likely the best spot for him would be something in between the positions, where he gets a little bit of everything. He’s got great leadership skills and will set the pace for any defense he’s part of and he’ll do that very quickly.

WHAT THE SCOUTS SAY

From an AFC scout – “He’s got athletic skills but he didn’t really produce much with that. He couldn’t get on the field until his junior season. Without a doubt I think he’s a safety. Some think he can play the corner but I think that’s nuts. He’s too stiff to handle a wideout in man coverage.”

From an NFC scout – “It’s a bad year for safeties and Carter is one of the better guys and he’s not going to have anybody jumping up and down for the chance to get him.”

WHAT HE HAS TO SAY

“If I can touch one person and change their future and they can grow up and touch one person and change their future, that’s all I’m shooting for.”

“I love playing football. I have a dream of playing in the pros. While I’m out there (on the field) I think about aspects of my life like my family and the foundation. The better I play, the better position I’ll be in to help them out.”

“I have the mindset that I want to help people out as soon as I can because tomorrow isn’t promised. If I make a difference today, I can live with that. If you’re in the position to help out others and have a positive effect on their life, why not do it?”

“I always say I want to be like my father, not in the fact that I want to do what he does, but be a successful African-American male that takes care of his family. That’s rare nowadays that you have a father figure. But my Dad was always around and really, really hard on me. I can take one stray step, and he’s going to be hard. He was my role model.”

WHAT OTHERS HAVE TO SAY

High school basketball coach Teral Fair – “He had a certain mental toughness. He had a huge eternal motor that separated him from most kids. He was just fearless and wanted to compete so bad. His overall demeanor was infectious with the other guys.”

Oklahoma teammate S Kevin Nelson – “On the field, he’s exactly what you want in a football player. He’s smart and he’s tough. But then, he’s such a role model and he’s so good with kids, it’s really cool to see.”

DOES HE FIT WITH THE CHIEFS?

How could he not when it comes to the intangibles? This guy had so much going for him in personality, intelligence, durability, etc. As busy as Carter was off the field, the folks at Oklahoma say it never caused a problem with his focus on football. That will be a concern of some in the NFL, including Pioli/Haley. They like csommunity active players, but they want the first focus to be football. Carter doesn’t play a position of need for the Chiefs, but I can’t imagine he isn’t part of their draft board.

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